How can a critical approach to the demographics of ageing better support city planning?

“City planners are demographic data-dependent” | Oslo 17th of May – by Gustavo Sugahara

Demographic data such as age, gender, and income, is perhaps the single most important source of information for city planners. As ageing in urban settlement emerges as a global demographic trend, a better understanding of the importance and limitations of demographics should be placed at the top of researchers’ list of priorities.

City planners are demographic data-dependent. That is, they rely on the composition of the neighborhoods and regions to make their decisions. To illustrate the importance of basic population information as the core facet of any city’s decisions, we can simply remember that most of a city’s standards are expressed in terms of population: The number of students per classroom, the number of trash bins by resident, and so forth. Read More

The London Design Museum Challenge to the Dominant Perspective on Ageing

From January 12th to February 19th the London Design Museum had an exhibition dedicated to the demographic change. Entitled “New Old” the exhibition looked at how design can help people lead fuller, healthier and more rewarding lives into old age.

The curator, Jeremy Myerson, a renowned academic dedicated to people-centred and inclusive design, could not be clearer about his perspective on the dominant perception about old-age:

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Solving Age-Friendly Dilemmas

A heritage of Roman culture developed by Portuguese during the nineteenth century, the Portuguese pavement is a good example of the potential dilemmas that can arise from age-friendly initiatives. That ancient city technology is not only a smart and eco-friendly solution but also an infinite source of inspiration for artists.

Photo by: Ricardo Ferreira

Photo by: Ricardo Ferreira

However, when it comes to pedestrian safety, in particular the safety of frail citizens, the Portuguese pavement might not be the most adequate technology available. In fact, it might represent a significant increased risk. Read More

Age-Smart Cities

In this video (published in February 2013) IBM presents their view for an “Age-Smart City”:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kDvW8R4BL0I

As usual, the perspective about ageing is pretty narrow. However, the video can be a good starting point for a discussion and brings some interesting examples.

Cultural Tips: The Greatest

Once I wanted to be the greatest
No wind or waterfall could stall me
And then came the rush of the flood
The stars at night turned deep to dust

Artist: Cat Power Director & Editor: Adam Hall Cinematography: Ryan Samul
Women’s Bowling League, Salt Lake City, Utah

World Population Ageing 2015

Source: UNDESA

Source: UNDESA

The United Nations Department of Economic  and Social Affairs recently published an interesting infochart about the World Population Ageing, reflecting the latest estimates and projections from the 2015 Revision of World Population Prospects.

Virtually every country in the world will experience growth in the number and share of older persons in the population over the next 15 years || Between 2015 and 2030, the number of older persons — those aged 60 years or over — in the world is projected to grow by 56 per cent, from 901 million to more than 1.4 billion

You can download the main demographic indicators for Norway here.
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Is Oslo ready for the longevity revolution?

Norway Life ExpctancyAfter completing their 60th birthday, the average Norwegian can expect to live for another 24 years. Within these, he or she can also expect to have almost 18 years of good health.

In Oslo, this fantastic human achievement has already transformed the landscape, but the coming years will bring new challenges. Read More