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Investigative journalism

Access to information as a tool for investigative journalism in the Maghreb

On the 28th and 29th of September,  ARTICLE 19  MENA in collaboration with Journalism & Media International Center (JMIC) at  OsloMet – Oslo Metropolitan University in Norway, held a regional training  on investigative journalism. The objective of the training was to bring together nine journalists from Algeria, Libya, Tunisia, and Morocco to equip them with […]

Nine journalists from Morocco, Algeria, Libya and Tunisia gathered in Tunis to learn..

On the 28th and 29th of September,  ARTICLE 19  MENA in collaboration with Journalism & Media International Center (JMIC) at  OsloMet – Oslo Metropolitan University in Norway, held a regional training  on investigative journalism.

The objective of the training was to bring together nine journalists from Algeria, Libya, Tunisia, and Morocco to equip them with writing skills and investigation techniques to help in producing news stories, notably techniques and the understanding of the legal framework of access to the information. 

The training was co-animated by Mohammed Alayoubi, investigative journalist from Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation and Amine ben Massaoud, Professor at Institute of Press and Information Sciences, with the support of Aymen Zaghdoudi, ARTICLE 19 MENA Legal Expert and Karim Belhaj Aissa, Transparency Program Coordinator in ARTICLE 19 MENA.

The training activities ranged from highlighting the legal framework regarding defamation and freedom of expression to clarifying the concept of investigative journalism. The participants got the opportunity to be exposed to the investigation methodology that entails choosing a good story and most importantly the way to investigate it based on a hypothetical approach. Additionally, they took benefit from the training when they were asked to elaborate an investigative writing in which the focus was on the chronology of the events and its logical sequencing.

The training was an opportunity to expand the knowledge on the legal tools and methods of access to information in order to obtain data. It covered also the aspects amongst others of building networks and the way and to find trustworthy resources.  Not to forget to mention the protection of sources and ways to prepare an interview as source of data collection.

The training ended by inviting the participants to elaborate investigative products as practical way to sharpen their skills and assimilate the gained knowledge. They will meet again in December, when the best story will be selected. The training is supported by the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

The participants also took part in the celebration of the International Day for Universal Access to Information (IDUAI). This was a two day event 26 – 27 September, organized by the local UNESCO office and partners in Tunisia. It was focused on the main recommendations and conclusions to ensure better implementation of the UNs sustainable development goal (SDG 16.10); to ensure public access to information and protect fundamental freedoms, in accordance with national legislation and international agreements.

Mohammed Alayoubi (in the middle above) during the celebration of the International Day for Universal Access to Information (IDUAI) in Tunis 26 – 27  September. He participated in a panel about the role of investigative journalism. 

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