Review of clothing disposal reasons

Authors: Kirsi Laitala and Ingun Grimstad Klepp, SIFO

Abstract

Garment lifetimes and longer serviceable life play important roles in discussions about the sustainability of clothing consumption.

A compilation of the research on clothing disposal motivations shows that there are three main reasons for disposal:

  1. Intrinsic quality (37%): Wear and tear-related issues such as shrinkage, tears and holes, fading of colour, broken zippers and loss of technical functions such as waterproofness.
  2. Fit (28%): Garments that do not fit either because the user has changed size, or the garment did not fit well to start with (for example due to unsuitable grading, insufficient wear ease or wrong size).
  3. Perceived value (35%): reasons where the consumer no longer wants the garment because it is outdated or out of fashion, or no longer is needed or wanted, or is not valued, for example when there is a lack of space in the wardrobe.

This shows that almost two-thirds of garments are discarded for reasons other than physical durability. Poor fit/design together with lack of perceived value by the owner are responsible for the majority of clothing disposals.

Physical strength is one of the several factors that are important if the lifetime of clothing is to be increased. However, it does not help to make clothes stronger if they are not going to be used longer anyway; this will just contribute to increased environmental impacts from the production and disposal phases. We do not need disposable products» that last for centuries. To work with reducing the environmental impacts of clothing consumption, it is important to optimize the match between strength, value and fit. This has the potential to reduce overproduction. Optimizing clothing lifespans will ensure the best possible utilization of the materials in line with the intentions of the circular economy.

Introduction

Garment lifetimes and longer serviceable life play important roles in discussions about the sustainability of clothing consumption.

Here we present the empirical findings summarized from the research that exists around clothing disposal. The review was originally conducted for the work with the development of durability criteria for Product Environmental Footprint Category Rules (PEFCR) for apparel and footwear. We believe this can be useful information for companies working to improve their products, and debate about clothing sustainability including the understanding of PEF.

We would like to thank Roy Kettlewell and Angus Ireland for their cooperation.

Method

The review includes empirical quantitative studies on clothing disposal reasons. The studies use varying methods, where online surveys are the most commonly used, but also two physical wardrobe studies are included. The way disposal reasons are studied varies as well. Many surveys ask for general, most common disposal reasons, while wardrobe studies and a few of the surveys focus on specific garments that the informants have disposed of. One of the online wardrobe surveys also asks for anticipated disposal reasons for specific garments instead of past behavior. All of the studies have been conducted between 1987 and 2020. The review excluded any studies that did not focus on disposal reasons or did not report results in a quantitative manner. In addition, it excludes a few lower-quality studies with methodological issues. In total 17 studies that fulfil the inclusion criteria were found.

Results

The review shows that clothing is discarded for many reasons. Table 1 summarizes the results and gives some information about the study sample such as where it was conducted and the number of respondents, as well as the main method that was used. Although there are differences between the surveys, they show a common feature. The results on disposal reasons could be placed in three main categories that were found in all reviewed studies: 1) intrinsic quality, 2) fit, and 3) perceived value, and an additional category for 4) other or unknown reasons. The categories include the following disposal reasons:

  1. Intrinsic quality: Wear and tear-related issues such as shrinkage, tears and holes, fading of colour, broken zippers and loss of technical functions such as waterproofness.
  2. Fit: Garments that do not fit either because the user has changed size, or the garment did not fit well to start with (for example due to unsuitable grading, insufficient wear ease or wrong size).
  3. Perceived value: reasons where the consumer no longer wants the garment because it is outdated or out of fashion, or no longer is needed or wanted, or is not valued, for example when there is a lack of space in the wardrobe.

StudyResearch design and sample sizeIntrinsic qualityFitPerceived valueOther / unknown
AC Nielsen (Laitala & Klepp, 2020)Survey in five countries, 1111 adults aged 18-64, anticipated disposal reason of 40,356 garments4413359
WRAP (2017)Survey in the UK, 2058 adults, 16,895 garments, disposal reasons per clothing category past year1842337
Laitala, Boks, and Klepp (2015)Wardrobe study in Norway, 25 adults (9 men and 16 women), 396 discarded garments50162410
Klepp (2001)Wardrobe study in Norway, 24 women aged 34- 46. 329 discarded garments31153321
Collett, Cluver, and Chen (2013)Interviews in the USA, 13 female students (aged 18 – 28). Each participant brought five fast fashion items that they no longer wear413821
Chun (1987)Survey in the USA, 89 female students (aged 18 – 30). Most recent garment disposal reason.629569
Lang, Armstrong, and Brannon (2013)Survey in the USA, 555 adults. General garment disposal reasons.303139
Koch and Domina (1997)Survey in the USA, 277 students (82% female). General disposal reasons and methods.293833
Koch and Domina (1999) and Domina and Koch (1999)Survey in the USA, 396 adults (88% female). General disposal reasons and methods.213742
Zhang et al. (2020)Survey in China, 507 adults (53% female). General disposal reasons.43192216
Ungerth and Carlsson (2011)Survey in Sweden, 1014 adults (age 16 – 74). The most common disposal reason.608219
YouGov (Stevanin, 2019)Survey in Italy, 992 adults, general disposal reasons.31242025
YouGov (2017a, 2017b, 2017c, 2017d, 2017e)Surveys in Australia, Philippine, Malaysia, Hong Kong & Singapore, in total 12,434 adults. General disposal reasons.3925297
MeanApprox. 20,000 adults34.125.831.412.6
Table 1. Summary of clothing disposal reasons in 17 consumer studies.

When the category of other/unknown reasons is excluded, the division between the three main disposal reason categories is quite similar, with intrinsic quality constituting about 37% of disposal reasons, followed by lack of perceived value (35%) and poor fit (28%) (Figure 1).

Figure 1: Clothing disposal reasons

Conclusion

A compilation of the research on clothing disposal motivations shows that there are three main reasons for disposal. Intrinsic quality, that is wear and tear and other physical changes of garments is the dominating disposal reason (37%), followed by lack of perceived value (35%) and poor fit (28%). This shows that almost two-thirds of garments are discarded for reasons other than physical durability. Poor fit/design together with lack of perceived value by the owner are responsible for the majority of clothing disposals.

Physical strength is one of the several factors that are important if the lifetime of clothing is to be increased. However, it does not help to make clothes stronger if they are not going to be used longer anyways, this will just contribute to increased environmental impacts from the production and disposal phases. We do not need «disposable products» that last for centuries. To work with reducing the environmental impacts of clothing consumption, it is important to optimize the match between strength, value and fit. Optimizing clothing lifespans will ensure the best possible utilization of the materials in line with the intentions of the circular economy.

References

Chun, H.-K. (1987). Differences between fashion innovators and non-fashion innovators in their clothing disposal practices. (Master’s thesis). Oregon State University, Corvallis. https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/v118rk195

Collett, M., Cluver, B., & Chen, H.-L. (2013). Consumer Perceptions the Limited Lifespan of Fast Fashion Apparel. Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, 17(2), 61-68. doi:10.1108/RJTA-17-02-2013-B009

Domina, T., & Koch, K. (1999). Consumer reuse and recycling of post-consumer textile waste. Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, 3(4), 346 – 359. doi:10.1108/eb022571

Klepp, I. G. (2001). Hvorfor går klær ut av bruk? Avhending sett i forhold til kvinners klesvaner [Why are clothes no longer used? Clothes disposal in relationship to women’s clothing habits]. Retrieved from Oslo: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12199/5390

Koch, K., & Domina, T. (1997). The effects of environmental attitude and fashion opinion leadership on textile recycling in the US. Journal of Consumer Studies & Home Economics, 21(1), 1-17. doi:10.1111/j.1470-6431.1997.tb00265.x

Koch, K., & Domina, T. (1999). Consumer Textile Recycling as a Means of Solid Waste Reduction. Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal, 28(1), 3-17. doi:10.1177/1077727×99281001

Laitala, K., Boks, C., & Klepp, I. G. (2015). Making Clothing Last: A Design Approach for Reducing the Environmental Impacts. International Journal of Design, 9(2), 93-107.

Laitala, K., & Klepp, I. G. (2020). What Affects Garment Lifespans? International Clothing Practices Based on a Wardrobe Survey in China, Germany, Japan, the UK, and the USA. Sustainability, 12(21), 9151. Retrieved from https://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/12/21/9151

Lang, C., Armstrong, C. M., & Brannon, L. A. (2013). Drivers of clothing disposal in the US: An exploration of the role of personal attributes and behaviours in frequent disposal. International Journal of Consumer Studies, 37(6), 706-714. doi:10.1111/ijcs.12060

Stevanin, E. (2019). Fast fashion: il continuo rinnovo del guardaroba. Retrieved from https://it.yougov.com/news/2019/05/27/fast-fashion-il-rinnovo-del-guardaroba/

Ungerth, L., & Carlsson, A. (2011). Vad händer sen med våra kläder? Enkätundersökning. Stockholm: http://www.konsumentforeningenstockholm.se/Global/Konsument%20och%20Milj%c3%b6/Rapporter/KfS%20rapport_april11_Vad%20h%c3%a4nder%20sen%20med%20v%c3%a5ra%20kl%c3%a4der.pdf

WRAP. (2017). Valuing Our Clothes: the cost of  UK fashionhttp://www.wrap.org.uk/sites/files/wrap/valuing-our-clothes-the-cost-of-uk-fashion_WRAP.pdf

YouGov. (2017a). Fast fashion: 27% of Malaysians have thrown away clothing after wearing it just once. Retrieved from https://my.yougov.com/en-my/news/2017/12/06/fast-fashion/

YouGov. (2017b). Fast fashion: 39% of Hong Kongers have thrown away clothing after wearing it just once. Retrieved from https://hk.yougov.com/en-hk/news/2017/12/06/fast-fashion/

YouGov. (2017c). Fast fashion: a third of Filipinos have thrown away clothing after wearing it just once. Retrieved from https://ph.yougov.com/en-ph/news/2017/12/06/fast-fashion/

YouGov. (2017d). Fast fashion: a third of Singaporeans have thrown away clothing after wearing it just once. Retrieved from https://sg.yougov.com/en-sg/news/2017/12/06/fast-fashion/

YouGov. (2017e). Fast fashion: Three in ten Aussies have thrown away clothing after wearing it just once. Retrieved from www.au.yougov.com/news/2017/12/06/fast-fashion/

Zhang, L., Wu, T., Liu, S., Jiang, S., Wu, H., & Yang, J. (2020). Consumers’ clothing disposal behaviors in Nanjing, China. Journal of Cleaner Production, 276, 123184.

Klær på ESA Sociology of Consumption-konferansen

Forrige uke var SIFO vertskap for en konferanse for det europeiske nettverket for forbrukssosiologi, en del av The European Sociological Association (ESA). Tema for konferansen var «Consumption, justice and futures: Where do we go from here? (oslomet.no)«. Det var 146 deltakere fra hele Europa, og de fleste fra SIFOs klesforskningsgruppe deltok også.

Klesgruppas Vilde Haugrønning presenterte arbeidet sitt i CHANGE og diskuterte foreløpige funn og metodeutvikling på bakgrunn av pilotstudien som er gjennomført i Norge, Uruguay og Portugal. Tittelen på presentasjonen var «Occasions and clothing volumes: wardrobe pilots in Norway, Portugal and Uruguay». Du kan lese sammendrag på denne lenken (conftool.org).

Klær som en del av tematikken

Konferansen bidro til ny faglig innsikt og som et av de store forbruksområdene, ble klær nevnt i mange kontekster. I form av mote, ble klær naturligvis brukt som et eksempel på hvordan forbrukere påvirkes til å ønske variasjon og fornyelse i Sophie Dubuisson-Quelliers keynote-presentasjon: «Why do we consume so much? Exploring the lock-ins of affluent consumption».

Julie Madons presentasjon «To make or not to make objects last? Consumers between prosumption and the desire for simplicity», lå tett opp til tematikken i vårt Lasting-prosjekt og tok for seg flere produktgrupper. Et viktig poeng fra presentasjonen var hvor subjektivt det kan være å si at noe er brukt opp – noen godtar hull i sko fordi de fortsatt er brukbare, mens andre ville kastet dem ved minste synlig tegn på slitasje. Du kan lese sammendraget fra presentasjonen her (confrool.org).

I samme sesjon presenterte Victoire Sessego «Do-It-Yourself practices throughout generations: the effects of digitalisation». Hun påpekte at selv om presentasjonen hennes var en del av en sesjon om bærekraftig forbruk så ble DIY-praksisene til hennes informanter på mange måter svært lite bærekraftige. Du kan lese sammendraget fra presentasjonen her (confrool.org).

Klær som hovedtema

I tillegg til disse presentasjonen og andre som inkluderte klær og tekstil som en del av fokuset, var det også flere spennende presentasjoner som dreide seg spesifikt om klær.

Reka Ines Tölg presenterte fra sitt doktorgradsarbeid ved Universitetet i Lund om hvordan ansvaret for å vedlikeholde klær og forlenge plaggs liv fordeles og forflyttes mellom forbrukere og produsenter. Tittelen på presentasjonen var «Consume with care and responsibility! The material-semiotic making and distribution of responsibilities in green marketing». Spesielt la vi i klesgruppa merke til fortellingen om plagg som skjøre som blir formidlet til forbrukeren av flere klesprodusenter og hvordan dette legger ansvaret over på forbrukeren dersom noe går i stykker. Vi spør oss om ikke heller produsenten selv burde lage klærne i bedre kvalitet i utgangspunktet? Du kan lese sammendrag på denne lenken (conftool.org).

I samme sesjon presenterte Gabriella Wulff fra Universitetet i Göteborg sitt arbeid om praksiser knyttet til salg: «The Future of Discounting Practices? Materials, meanings, and competences in the Swedish Fashion Retail Sector». Fra vårt perspektiv er det spesielt interessant hvordan bransjen selv ser på praksiser rundt prisreduksjoner som et nødvendig onde i en forretningsmodell basert på stordriftsfordelene av å bestille store kvanta. Allikevel forsøker de å forhindre, og “aktivere” plagg på forskjellige måte for å unngå å selge dem til reduserte priser. Funnene påpeker andre sider ved overproduksjonen som foregår i bransjen. Du kan lese sammendrag på denne lenken (conftool.org).

Også forbruk av bruktklær ble diskutert da Ariela Mortara snakket om brukere av Vinted-appen i Italia i presentasjonen «Second-hand clothing between savings and sustainability: Vinted case history». Du kan lese sammendrag via denne lenken (conftool.org).

Lansering av Lettfiks – Klær med ni liv

Boklansering: 14. oktober 2021, 17:30 – 20:00
Sted: Kulturhuset, Oslo

Vi har den store glede å invitere til lansering av siste bok i trilogien om klær og miljø: Lettfiks. Den handler om hvordan du kan få klær til å vare og gi dem nye liv, gjennom tilpasning, omsøm og reparasjon og ved å gjenbruke og resirkulere klær i eget hushold.Boka er skrevet av SIFO-forsker Ingun Grimstad Klepp og journalist Tone Skårdal Tobiasson.

Program:

Betraktninger fra en leser: Runar Døving

Dialog mellom aktører som gir tekstiler livsforlengende behandling og de to forfatterne:
Julie Skarland, Eva Kittelsen fra My Visible Mend og Jo Egil Tobiassen fra Northern Playground i samtale med Ingun og Tone

Panelsamtale: Hvordan kan livsforlengende tiltak for klær styrkes politisk?
Med Forbrukerrådet, Framtiden i våre hender og Naturvernforbundet

Spørsmålsrunde: Vi åpner for at folk i salen eller de som er med på stream kan stille spørsmål både til aktørene og paneldeltakerne.

Antrekk: Reparert! Finn fram ditt beste omsydde, reparerte eller tilpassede plagg og medbrakt sytøy.

Velkommen!

Meld deg på gjennom Facebook arrangementet her (facebook.com).

Det blir også streaming fra SIFOs Facebook-side!

Grønne klær – gjør det sjæl!

Foredrag: Lørdag 18.09.2021 kl. 11:00 – 12:30
Sted: Kommandantgårdens Parolesal, Gamlebyen Fredrikstad

De tre bøkene som professor i klær og bærekraft Klepp og journalist Tobiasson har kommet med de siste årene (Lettstelt, Lettkledd og Lettfiks) handler alle om klær og miljø, garn og garderober. I dette foredraget vil de dra noen historiske linjer og ta oss med inn i en ‘vekkelsesbølge’ som omfavner håndarbeid og synlig reparasjon, og å ta bedre vare på klærne. Flere har fått øynene opp for at klær kan være både verdifulle, vakre og derfor vil de to snakke om hvordan vi selv kan bidra til en «grønn garderobe» gjennom riktig stell, bedre valg og en dose omsorg og kjærlighet med nål og tråd, strikkegarn og strikkepinner.

Mer informasjon om programmet for Strikkefestivalen og påmelding til foredraget finner du her (strikkefestivalen.no).

Product lifetime in European and Norwegian policies

Nina Heidenstrøm, Pål Strandbakken, Vilde Haugrønning og Kirsi Laitala

Sammendrag

Formålet med denne rapporten er å få en bedre forståelse av hvordan produktlevetid har blitt posisjonert i politikken de siste tjue årene. Ved bruk av dokumentanalyse undersøker vi forekomsten og kontekstualiseringen av produktlevetid i EUs sirkulærøkonomipolitikk, norske partiprogrammer og offisielle dokumenter, dokumenter fra norske miljøorganisasjoner, forbrukerorganisasjoners politikk og produktpolitikk. Samlet finner vi at det er lite fokus på produktlevetid mellom 2000-2015, menat det har vært en stor økning i fokus de siste fem årene. Imidlertid er det fremdeles lang vei å gå i arbeidet med å utvikle tiltak som faktisk adresserer produktlevetid.

Klikk her for å lese hele rapporten på engelsk (oda.oslomet.no).